Teiglach

By#CookJewishBeJewish

Teiglach

Probably The most loved dessert from childhood and the most secret one.

 I remember then 5 years ago I  wanted to serve them for friends and family for Rosh Hashanah and since the grandma that was making them was no longer with us and of course no written recipe was left i started to look for one in the community. 

 I couldn’t get one for a long time. All the Balabustes i knew that makes a good ones and i asked,  literally refused to give one. I’m not talking about not revealing the little secrets or tips to succeed or even  lying about the proportions it was  just no, sorry i’m not sharing.  

And no wonder why so little people know this recipe you actually usually don’t have an opportunity to watch and to learn its a custom to literally frown everyone from the kitchen and ideally from home for at least 4 hours, because teiglach is so sensitive to the noises…. I believe that was the only moment then balabuste before Rosh Hashana or Sabbat  could rest and be with herself… Maybe its genetic thing, I usually do it myself at night then everyone else is sleeping.

Then I finally managed to get one and spend long hours in the kitchen. I only managed to get a hint of the childhood taste so i continued my research and thanks to good friends who shared and some experimentation i can finally share it with you.

6 eggs 

2 spoons of sugar

2 spoons of oil

1 spoon of cognague 

A pinch of salt

300 g of flour  ( can take more depending on the flour, but make sure it’s not too firm)

25 raisins 

Some sugar for the last coating

1.5 kg of honey ( better to use the light one, it will get darker during the cooking). 

2 spoons of water

10 wet  kitchen towels

1 big pot with a heavy lid that closes well

Non sticking surface to work 

Patience 

How:

Make sure all the ingredients are same room temperature

Beat the eggs with sugar salt and oil mix in the flour  form around 20 -24 ropes of a size of a finger, tight them in a knot with a raisin in the middle.

Boil the honey with water and add all the teiglach in. Close the lid and on high boil teiglach without sitting or opening. 

 It is supposed to stay closed for about 20 minutes but at this moment the honey usually starts running away and making a mess, be ready for that. Clean around and lower the heat and try not to open for about 40 minutes.

Open, gently with a wooden spatula stir, by bringing the ones who are closer to the bottom up. And close the lid again.

Open again in 30 minutes , repeat until they are nicely brown – everything will take around 3 hours…

Take them out  on a non sticking surface with some sugar to make sure it’s not sticking. I don’t cover it with sugar ( i don’t like then it’s too much) to the sugar and let cool. They are supposed to be crunchy from outside and soft from the inside.

You are probably wondering why you would need   10 of wet towels? That’s actually the only way I manage to regulate the temperature of honey boiling and prevent it from running again. I wet them in cold water every 20 minutes and keep putting them on top of the lid … But maybe you wont need it but i have warned you .

Now you have lots of honey left, technically you can do another batch and just add some new honey. Practically i usually make a lekach spicy honey cake, it can work for a honey glazed chicken or in floimen tzimes.

The old Jewish legend says that they can stay forever fresh, but nobody ever succeeded to test it. But if you really need them to stay very long, put in the honey 2 spoons of water, mix and keep teiglach in the honey.

Beteavon 

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